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Disability Arts Online

From the archive: the impressive asymmetry of Mark Ware's digital imagery / 11 May 2014

digital image of a mummified figure at the centre of a tree-like series of branches

A still from the film entiled, 'The Dog That Barked Like A Bird'

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I intended at the beginning of the year to celebrate Dao's tenth year by writing a monthly blog reviewing key works  that have helped to shape what the journal is and who it is for. Earlier in the year I looked back at Peter Street’s war poetry, published in December 2006, which has left an indelible imprint on my consciousness.

Back in 2004, I was running the site from a computer in the Mind offices in Lewes, kindly offered by the Director, Paddy Mobbs. I can't remember how I was introduced to Mark Ware. But from my own experience of playing with photoshop I was impressed by his images.

There was a painstaking exactitude to the asymmetry of the digital stills from The Dog that Barked like a Bird - and the extent to which the work was made to illustrate Mark’s ‘ways of seeing’ - to quote John Berger.

Mark Ware's artwork coming after decades of experience of professional artistic practice, broke rules in an informed and unique way, precisely because it was coming from personal experience of impairment. Mark's story of how the work was intended to describe the impact of a stroke, which left him with sight that registered at different speeds in each of his eyes, was fascinating. 

His work illustrates the impact of an impairment giving him a much enhanced depth of field. It felt right that Disability Arts Online should be open to showcasing artwork that talked about impairment from an informed, yet positive perspective that told a story that cut through the worthy / victim narratives that are all too often told about disabled people.

Comments

Wendy Young

/
13 May 2014

What a powerful 'still' - love it. What an inspirational story.