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A guest editorial from Q.S Is in response to Colin Hambrook's article on medication and mental health / 7 January 2013

a black and white drawing of a woman knitting

A Dream of An Impossible Knitter © Colin Hambrook

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I read your DAO editorial Colin and found it very illuminating. I'm personally, not an advocate of medication either. Actually, I've been asked to write a book by an organisation called KAOS, based in Brussels, which will include essays detailing my own personal strategies and methodologies to deal with issues of the mind, along with accompanying artwork. I have no proof, but I think making art and writing helped me recover from psychosis and stopped a recurrence of episodes.

I think the main demon remains society, the people within it who judge you for having a ‘different sort of brain.’  I am working with an interesting psychiatrist, Dr Erik Thys, who is neither for nor against medication. He's also a practicing artist and musician!

What I did notice, working with people diagnosed with 'schizophrenia', on my latest scroll project was that they seemed 'changed' on long term medication. They had a certain manner and way of talking and moving, the physiological effects were self-evident, but they remained wonderful open people. I would go as far to say that all of us who have experienced psychosis were ‘naked in the room’ not literally, but psychologically. Psychosis strips the mortal bare of everything. They also found working on the scroll to be immensely beneficial to them mentally.

Interestingly, most people have no idea that I have ‘mental health’ issues. Oh how I hate that term. Nor do they have any inkling that I have experienced ‘multiple psychotic episodes’ - oh I how I loathe that expression too. The problem with both these terms is that they are extremely loaded with erroneous stereotypes and any admission of either is tantamount to professional or social suicide (tacit or overt), which is why people remain silent and then break down behind closed doors or end up exploding mentally and causing a wave of destruction personally or otherwise.

I would argue, in my case, that my brain is just fine, it’s a curious, probing mind, and society has slowly pricked it leaving tiny lacerations that have not properly healed and psychosis was probably one too many lacerations that created cracks tantamount to an earthquake. This is a better description of what has happened inside my head. How can we assume that pills can erase the devastation caused by a brain earthquake. It is ludicrous?

I really appreciate your drawings. Tracey Emin once referred to my drawings as Brain Drawings and I think yours fit that description too. I’ve been examining them very closely, studying the details and there are so many parallels with my own style of drawing, the maniacal attention to detail the recurrence of certain mark making. I found the same visual parallels with the work of the Japanese artist, Yayoi Kusama, which makes me wonder if psychosis unlocks certain creative doors in the mind that are closed off to others. It is the same with the poems; the visual motifs that recur within them are very familiar.

There is an intensity in your/our work that can only come from experiencing psychosis, and the mark making serves as an alternative form of medication, by distracting the mind, by using the hands, by creating something on a piece of blank whiteness and transferring the memories that continue to haunt and refuse to budge.

Coming through the other side of psychosis can be lonely, some people don’t come ‘back’ but if you do return to the ‘real world’ it can seem more hostile and unforgiving than before. Psychosis is traumatic and unless you have experienced it, no one can begin to fathom what you have been through, you try to explain it, but each person’s experience is unique because psychosis transports you to a parallel universe where you reign supreme and everything is heightened. I see those details in your poems, but the experience remains unique to you, just as mine is unique to me and it’s hard for other people to access such an alien world.

I think there are parallels in what we are both trying to do and there are not many people on the same page, not many people who want to go there. You are brave by putting your poems online, by putting your mind out there and not feeling ashamed of what you have been through. I hope one day to find the same courage.

It's a relief though to know that 'you are not alone.'

The problem is no one wants to talk about psychosis properly. In certain programmes I have listened to on the radio it's dealt with superficially (my personal opinion) or as something novel/intriguing/freakish/voyeuristic, perhaps it is just not possible to distill the experience without alienating the listener with all the immense detail and nuances.

Psychosis is tantamount to a complex painting that you can’t fathom in one sitting. It takes years to penetrate the layers and work out the very first brush stroke of a painting that has no form and yet encompasses the universe that all our minds are capable of being.

Keywords: art,medical model,memories,protest,psychiatric medication,psychiatry,visual art

Comments

Joe McConnell

/
11 January 2013

Thanks for this interesting article and also the link to the piece in the Independent. A couple of years ago, I wrote here on DAO about a relatively positive experience at a MH Recovery Centre in Camden. I have had further contact with that system and feel that it has changed utterly. The way the cuts have been managed by top management (despite great resistance at lower levels of management and personnel) has made the recovery programmes incoherent and far less effective. There's all this claptrap about 'choices', 'personalisation' etc. In the end, it looks like there's been a massive capitulation to the shysters that run this country and the top brass of Camden and Islington Trust are pretending that 'it's not all that bad'. I spent a couple of weeks in Highgate Mental Health Hospital in June of 2012, and found the whole approach to care and recovery nothing short of lamentable.

Colin

/
10 January 2013

According to Jeremy Lawrence in the Independent little, if anything has changed in mental health 'care' over the last 10 years "http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/the-mentally-ill-are-still-neglected-and-stigmatised--just-as-i-found-they-were-10-years-ago-8313312.html

Colm Dermot Lawlor

/
7 January 2013

Drawing is all I can do

Letter 2 Oprah Winfrey Unanswered.

‪https://www.facebook.com/colm.lawlor1‬

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