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There's a new kid on the block

There's a new kid on the block folks ...


Identifying himself as 'Bonk Bipolar' (inspired from the Criptart character) he'll be adding his thoughts and feelings to the DAO Blog section on a regular basis.  He boldly opens up his head and heart and invites us to follow him along some extraordinary paths.


So let me introduce you to his unique style of poetry/rapping with this piece entitled Wrap Rap.


Wrap Rap

Too many ideas to achieve today,

so many thoughts that have run away.

Often I gaze and look into the grey matter

that is the patter

on my milky way.


I wander through days

and act on my gaze,

but nowhere it goes ... as my mind's a slave ...

to my inspirations and drive that go round and round

more often than not, driving me into the ground.


The options I strive for never seem to come near,

yet my thoughts and time get lost without fear.

I sit again at this pad with lettered keys

and a world I'm connected by internet that can often deceive.


My brain goes round and round and round,

yet I'm not moving, not a peep not a sound.

I can open my mind and step onto a cloud,
placing myself in a busy bustling crowd. 


Am I mental?  I ask myself with a chuckle

then I answer  with yes,

and a proud internal stutter!

Sitting wondering why my mind has these ticks,

never understanding what it is that makes me lick ...

my top front lip and why I rotate my neck ... 
‘till it clicks.


Oh no my legs are beginning to twitch,

stuck in this body like a trick,

deep breath in and out

can stop me from feeling shit.

Mind slowing

as I

take

charge

of it.


One again the brain,

my brain has caused these deep tricks.

Wonder why now I can hear conversations?

They’re not real as the people are not here,

but yet clear as day.

I look over my shoulder,

I'm sat all alone by myself and beginning to wonder...

is it real or am I having a moment?!


“Shut up Bonk” you’re starting to mutter,

if you told people what you did they would call you a NUTTER!

So when I'm quiet and

looking lost 

looking puzzled and stuck! 
Don't worry about me as I'm talking to US ... 

US being me myself and I,

and WE don't give a Fu*K!


 


Bonk Bi-Polar's blog starts in a few days. Click here for the link.

Posted by Dave Lupton, 19 February 2013

Last modified by Dave Lupton, 19 February 2013

The Criptarts are revolting!

One of the things I enjoy about being part of the Disability Arts on Line (DAO) family is that it provides for me a unique platform on which I can present my more adventurous cartoons.

Take the Criptarts for example. I haven't a clue where it's going each week and the end result is usually more of a surprise to me than to you. Of course I've got a rough outline in my mind for each episode, but it's as though the characters come alive once I've started to lay them out in the strip and they just take over.

You've only got to look at the last but one episode for an example. I'd decided to make some sort of comment about the heavy snow we'd been experiencing. I'd got a story-line mapped out and was pretty sure where it was going when Bonk, the self-defined 'nutter' with the purple spiky hair, suddenly jumped in with his joke. Just as I was about to make some serious comment about reduced access. As Aadila said: "Gross!"

You can go to the episode by clicking here.

And last week. Inspired by Liz Carr's performance as Clarissa Mullery on Silent Witness, I'd decided to 'guest' her on the strip. But what happens? The characters take over again and use it as an opportunity to take a poke at the government!

Click here and you'll see what I mean.

It was the same when I invited Penny Pepper onto the strip. I still haven't got the felt tip off the laptop!

Click here ...

So as the strip continues, be prepared for further undisciplined behaviour from Bonk, Liz, Aadila, Ben, Ranj, Val, and their guests. I will try and exercise some editorial control, but as  Colin Hambrook, DAO Editor, knows from past experience (especially with me!), I don't hold out much hope!

Posted by Dave Lupton, 7 February 2013

Last modified by Dave Lupton, 7 February 2013

A disturbing story brought to us by Disability Now

This is an extract from an excellent article in Disability Now (DN) about disabled asylum seekers using art to express themselves through a painted mural in Bristol.

In the DN article, Disabled Iraqi Ahmed tells us a disturbing account about their lives and their treatment in Britain.

"People in Britain don’t seem to like the disabled. I see lots of disabled people. They drink in the park, they have nowhere to live. They try to kill themselves ...

"Britain says Iraq is rubbish but even in Iraq and Kurdistan people are treated better than this. My family send me money every month ...

"Who made me disabled? The government. Britain, America, Iraq. The governments fought. They made me disabled. They injured my leg in an explosion. I lost my mind. I lost my brother. My mother can’t talk properly now: she lost an eye and an arm in the explosion.

"The Government should be helping these people. They put me into a hostel with people who abuse drugs and drink. I’ve never drunk alcohol in my life. Why house me with drug users?

"Does this country respect disabled people? They make them sleep on the street.

"In my country, when someone dies, people come and check on you. My brother died last year. Only one person came to see me when I heard that he’d been killed. I was bleeding inside. I couldn’t talk. My family say “Are there any people around you?” I say “No.” My mother says “Be strong.”

"I’ve never seen such bad people as here. No one came to help me. I needed people to listen. I felt my insides going into a small hole. I needed a place to forget my pain. When I hear news about Iraq I just cry.

"I’m not here to slag off the Iraqi government or British government. I can’t talk properly. I don’t remember how long it’s been since I talked to my mum ... lots of people sleep on the street. My inside is always crying.

"Britain came to my country. They smashed everything, they killed people. When I came here I asked for help, but they wouldn’t help me. England has lost its mind ...

"People call me names. They say I come from the jungle. They don’t believe the things I say. They say I’m lying. I’m not lying ... it’s because I’m brown and disabled.

"They’re racist and the Government doesn’t do anything to help. They should be shouting, “Look after disabled people!”"

For the full story go to the DN web site.
 

Posted by Dave Lupton, 31 July 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 10 November 2012

Knocking down the wall

Last week at the Shape media conference I had the pleasure of meeting Kristina Veasey. She has taken part in two Paralympics and talked about her own experiences competing as a disabled athlete.

For most of us non-athletic Crips, and in particular those of us involved in disability arts, the world of the Paralympian seems remote to say the least. We see them as single minded Super Crips with no interest or involvement in disability politics and protest. What we do hear about are those sporty wheelchair users with amazing upper body strength telling non-disabled people that they don't need ramps!

The media love them as well, providing photo opportunities of 'good' disabled people (as opposed to 'bad' disabled people who are scrounging on disability benefit and can't be arsed to find a job!).

All this media hype of course goes to reinforce the stereotypes of disability that Mr and Mrs Jo Public know and love. The acceptable face of disability versus the unacceptable.

But having chatted to Kristina after her talk, I learned a few things. For example did you know that all Paralympians have to sign a contract that specifically prohibits them from taking part in any political protest during the duration of the games?

This means that if they did protest for the duration of the games, (against ATOS for example) they would have sacrificed years of training and would have to return any medals that they had won.

But some paralympians find ways around the system. For example Kristina told me that was why, as a retired paralympian, she became Amnesty International's paralympic ambassador during the Beijing games - "so I could give voice to protest."

Perhaps between us all - paralympians, activists, disabled artists - we could start to tear down the wall that the media & society have erected and start working together.

As ever the challenge is to be able to communicate more openly with each other and to be prepared to let go of those unhelpful stereotypes. I include myself in this as a veteran of creating and maintaining some of these stereotypes. My exchange with Kristina was a kick in my assumptions which I found very helpful and thought provoking.

Perhaps all disabled people, all working together could create a power base strong enough to bring this government and their draconian measures to a shuddering halt.

We can but hope.

BTW if you do have tickets for Paralympic events you may be asked to participate in an on-line survey. Why not use this opportunity to voice some of our concerns about the dichotomy between the experiences of paralympians and many other disabled people. Here's your chance to comment on the gap between the portrayal of paralympic athletes and the daily struggle against barriers that most disabled people face.

Posted by Dave Lupton, 29 June 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 10 November 2012